Rewriting the Reich: German Women Journalists as Transnational Mediators for Germany's Rehabilitation

TitleRewriting the Reich: German Women Journalists as Transnational Mediators for Germany's Rehabilitation
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsBarton, Deborah
JournalCentral European History
Volume51
Issue4
Start Page563
Pagination563 - 584
Date Published12/2018
Abstract

This article looks at the transnational impact of two diaries written by the female German journalists Ruth Andreas-Friedrich and Ursula von Kardorff, whose journals shed light on German wartime experiences, resistance activities, and, to a lesser extent, the press. In the postwar years, both journalists sought to influence (West) Germany's relationship with its former enemies, in particular the United States. In their autobiographical writing, they presented both an image of Germany as a victim of Nazism, as well as an early acknowledgment of German crimes. In this way, they achieved a balanced narrative that received a positive reception from American and German audiences. Though the ways in which Friedrich and Kardorff presented aspects of journalism and everyday life in the Third Reich were not unique, their dual identity as women and journalists underlay their ability to act as "legitimate" mediators for Germany's rehabilitation. Western allied occupation authorities and overseas audiences viewed them, in contrast to men, as largely apolitical because they were women, and as objective witnesses because they were journalists. Through their autobiographical writings, both journalists situated themselves among the predominantly male US and German elites devoted to developing amicable relations between the two countries via soft-power diplomacy. (Author)

URLhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/central-european-history/article/rewriting-the-reich-german-women-journalists-as-transnational-mediators-for-germanys-rehabilitation/3CB77EFAD2ED488BD09BA07CD49CFEF0
Entry by GWC Assistants / Work by GWC Assistants : 

Time Period:

Countries: