Abraham in Arms: War and Gender in Colonial New England

TitleAbraham in Arms: War and Gender in Colonial New England
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsLittle, Ann M.
Number of Pages262
PublisherUniversity of Pennsylvania Press
CityPhiladelphia
Abstract

In a bold reinterpretation of the years between 1620 and 1763, Ann M. Little reveals how ideas about gender and family life were central to the ways people in colonial New England, and their neighbors in New France and Indian Country, described their experiences in cross-cultural warfare. Little argues that English, French, and Indian people had broadly similar ideas about gender and authority. Because they understood both warfare and political power to be intertwined expressions of manhood, colonial warfare may be understood as a contest of different styles of masculinity. For New England men, what had once been a masculinity based on household headship, Christian piety, and the duty to protect family and faith became one built around the more abstract notions of British nationalism, anti-Catholicism, and soldiering for the Empire. Based on archival research in both French and English sources, court records, captivity narratives, and the private correspondence of ministers and war officials, Abraham in Arms reconstructs colonial New England as a frontier borderland in which religious, cultural, linguistic, and geographic boundaries were permeable, fragile, and contested by Europeans and Indians alike.

URLhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt3fhfn3
Reprint EditionFull text available through JSTOR and Project MUSE.
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