The Diary of Elizabeth Drinker: The Life Cycle of an Eighteenth-Century Woman

TitleThe Diary of Elizabeth Drinker: The Life Cycle of an Eighteenth-Century Woman
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsCrane, Elaine Forman
PublisherUniversity of Pennsylvania Press
CityPhiladelphia
Abstract

The journal of Philadelphia Quaker, Elizabeth Sandwith Drinker (1735–1807), is perhaps the single most significant personal record of eighteenth-century life in America from a woman's perspective. Drinker wrote in her diary nearly continuously between 1758 and 1807, from two years before her marriage to the night before her last illness. The extraordinary span and sustained quality of the journal make it a rewarding document for a multitude of historical purposes. Drinker saw English colonies evolve into the American nation while she herself changed from a young unmarried woman into a wife, mother, and grandmother. Her journal entries touch on every contemporary subject, political, personal, and familial. There is little that escaped Drinker's quill, and her diary is a delight not only for the information it contains, but also for the way in which she conveys her world across the centuries.

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29877804

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