Deux femmes œuvrant dans la Grande Guerre : Louise de Bettignies et la reine Élisabeth

TitleDeux femmes œuvrant dans la Grande Guerre : Louise de Bettignies et la reine Élisabeth
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsAntier, Chantal
JournalRevue Historique des Armées
Issue272
Start Page51-60
Date Published11/2013
Abstract

Since the canteen women or nurses of the war of 1870, women have evolved, and in 1914 they sought not to participate in combat, which was denied to them, but to perform the tasks required of them. Numerous resistors appeared in Belgium and in the invaded parts of the north and east of France against the German occupation, which was particularly cruel to women. Many of them moved from resistance to espionage, at the request of British, French, and Belgian intelligence, since they were less controlled than the men. Charged with directing a network or directly monitoring any movement of troops in the vicinity of railways and waterways, these women such as Louise de Bettignies accepted a perilous role that could result in their death or life imprisonment. Also threatened are those charged by the Queen of Belgium to prepare peace talks between the Allies and the Germans.

URLhttps://journals.openedition.org/rha/7782
Translated TitleTwo Women Working in the Great War: Louise de Bettignies and Queen Élisabeth
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