'To Establish a Community of Property': Marriage and Race Before and During the Haitian Revolution

Title'To Establish a Community of Property': Marriage and Race Before and During the Haitian Revolution
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsGarrigus, John D.
JournalHistory of the Family
Volume12
Issue2
Pagination142-152
Date Published2007
Abstract

The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) was the greatest social upheaval in the Age of Atlantic Revolutions. The paper presents results from the first systematic study of marriage during this event, which included slave rebellion (1791), general emancipation (1793) and political independence from France (1803). The article focuses on a single colonial parish, leveraging a sample of roughly 1000 contracts by comparing them with similar documents from same region in the 1760s and 1780s. Ironically, amid a revolution that was ostensibly eliminating slavery and racism, the interracial marriages that had once been common in this parish virtually disappeared. The wealthy “mulatto” families who had been free long before 1791 intensified their pre-Revolutionary pattern of endogamy and cousin-marriage. In the meantime, French male immigrants of the sort who, before the Revolution, had allied with these established clans, now shunned these marriages.

URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1016/j.hisfam.2007.09.003
Short Title'To Establish a Community of Property'
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