Manipulating Masculinity: War and Gender in Modern British and American Literature

TitleManipulating Masculinity: War and Gender in Modern British and American Literature
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsPhillips, Kathy
Number of Pages240
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
CityNew York
Abstract

Manipulating Masculinity uses literature from World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War, and the Iraq wars to argue that when a society labels broadly human traits "feminine," that society can more easily manipulate men to war. All men are bound to detect some of those traits in themselves--and then fear that they have strayed into a feminine, inferior realm. If a society convinces men that fighting is essentially manly, it entices men to war simply to prove that they are not their sisters (sissy, wimp, wuss). Western cultural attitudes toward sex also fuel wars by encouraging the displacement of sexuality into violence, by fostering titillation in combination with guilt and its accompanying need for self-punishment (which war abundantly supplies), and by defining sexual orientations so as to provoke self-doubt in everyone.

Short TitleManipulating Masculinity
Entry by GWC Assistants / Work by GWC Assistants : 

Type of Literature: