Exceeding the Needs of the Service: The French Army and the Suppression of Female Auxiliaries, 1871–1906

TitleExceeding the Needs of the Service: The French Army and the Suppression of Female Auxiliaries, 1871–1906
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsCardoza, Thomas
JournalWar and Society
Volume20
Issue1
Pagination1-22
Date Published05/2002
Abstract

Throughout history, contrary to popular belief, there has been an abundance of females involved in warfare. Taking mostly supply and support roles in European militaries or enlisting in disguise, women were commonplace around battlefields and military encampments. In the first half of the 19th century, though, European countries tried to steadily diminsh the roles women were allowed to hold, with the exception of France. Female sutlers known as cantinieres continued to serve in the French Army with status until the 1870s, when their status began to be eroded, and their role finally suppressed in 1905-1906. The demise of the cantinieres had two main causes: the strong drive for efficiency-based reform within the army following the Franco-Prussian War, and the desire of the Radical Republican politicians to alter the nature of recruiting. 

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1179/072924702791201944
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