The Forgotten Army of Women: The Overseas Service of Queen Mary Army Auxiliary Corps with the British Forces, 1917-1921

TitleThe Forgotten Army of Women: The Overseas Service of Queen Mary Army Auxiliary Corps with the British Forces, 1917-1921
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication1996
AuthorsShaw, Diana
EditorCecil, Hugh P., and Peter Liddle
Book TitleFacing Armageddon: The First World War Experienced
Pagination365-379
PublisherCooper
CityLondon
Abstract

This book chapter in the edited volume Facing Armageddon: The First World War Experienced explores the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) created in 1917 to free up more men to go and fight in the First World War. It was the first time women had served in the British Army other than as nurses. The corps was eventually disbanded in 1921. Women were restricted to ‘feminine’, auxiliary roles, such as store work, administration and catering. They were also initially confined to service in Britain, but this was quickly expanded to France, with Helen Gwynne-Vaughan appointed as Chief Controller Overseas. Impressed with the WAAC's work, Queen Mary became its patron in 1918. The corps was renamed Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps (QMAAC) to reflect its fine conduct during the German Spring Offensive of that year.

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35284085

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