Empires and Indigenes: Intercultural Alliance, Imperial Expansion, and Warfare in the Early Modern World

TitleEmpires and Indigenes: Intercultural Alliance, Imperial Expansion, and Warfare in the Early Modern World
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsLee, Wayne E.
Number of Pages305
PublisherNew York University Press
CityNew York
Abstract

The early modern period (c. 1500-1800) of world history is characterized by the establishment and aggressive expansion of European empires, and warfare between imperial powers and indigenous peoples was a central component of the quest for global dominance. From the Portuguese in Africa to the Russians and Ottomans in Central Asia, empire builders could not avoid military interactions with native populations, and many discovered that imperial expansion was impossible without the cooperation, and, in some cases, alliances with the natives they encountered in the new worlds they sought to rule. Empires and Indigenes is a sweeping examination of how intercultural interactions between Europeans and indigenous people influenced military choices and strategic action. Ranging from the Muscovites on the western steppe to the French and English in North America, it analyzes how diplomatic and military systems were designed to accommodate the demands and expectations of local peoples, who aided the imperial powers even as they often became subordinated to them. 

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