Fit to Fight but not to Vote? Masculinity and Citizenship in Britain, 1832–1918

TitleFit to Fight but not to Vote? Masculinity and Citizenship in Britain, 1832–1918
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsRose, Sonya O.
EditorDudink, Stefan, Karen Hagemann, and Anna Clark
Book TitleRepresenting Masculinity: Male Citizenship in Modern Western Culture
Pagination131-150
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
City, CountryNew York
Abstract

Volume: The idea that citizenship was the right of all humanity emerged during the French Revolution. However, this right was limited by gender, class and race. Studying Europe and its colonies and the United States, this book analyzes images of masculine citizenship in political rhetoric, culture, and various political struggles from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Politicians manipulated the rhetoric of masculine citizenship, using images of paternity and fraternity. Art represented competing images of the masculine citizen, ranging from the black revolutionary to the neo-Greek white statue. Political subjects in empires and colonies appropriated and subverted these western ideals, revealing the exclusions in the rhetoric of masculine citizenship.

URLhttp://us.macmillan.com/representingmasculinity/StefanDudink
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122715414

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