Towards an International Human Rights Regime during the Inter-War Years: The League of Nations’ Combat of Traffic in Women and Children

TitleTowards an International Human Rights Regime during the Inter-War Years: The League of Nations’ Combat of Traffic in Women and Children
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsMetzger, Barbara
EditorGrant, Kevin, Philippa Levine, and Frank Trentmann
Book TitleBeyond Sovereignty: Britain, Empire and Transnationalism, 1880–1950
Pagination54–79
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
CityBasingstoke, UK
Abstract

Hardly a single month goes by without a horrific case of traffic in women, men or children hitting the headlines. This sad phenomenon is by no means a recent one. In 1919, the issue of ‘traffic in women and children’ was already considered to be of such importance that the League of Nations was explicitly charged with its combat. Article 23 (c) of the Covenant entrusted the League "with the general supervision over the execution of agreements with regard to the traffic in women and children." In 1921, the Second Assembly of the League of Nations adopted a Convention on the Suppression of Traffic in Women and Children and created an institutional framework for the League to act as an active monitoring body. Until the outbreak of the Second World War, the League put considerable efforts into encouraging states to address the issue and implement legal, political and social measures to curb international traffic in women and children. However, while the League was made up of sovereign states implementing its policies, its work was heavily substantiated and moved by complex transnational networks that provided the key momentum for the League’s work.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057/9780230626522_4
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939918009

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