Homefront: Food, Politics and Women's Everyday Life during the First World War

TitleHomefront: Food, Politics and Women's Everyday Life during the First World War
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsDavis, Belinda J.
EditorHagemann, Karen, and Stefanie Schüler-Springorum
Book TitleHome/Front: The Military, War, and Gender in Twentieth-Century Germany
Pagination115-138
PublisherBerg
CityOxford and New York
Abstract

In the book chapter "Homefront: Food, Politics and Women's Everyday Life during the First World War," in the edited volume Home/Front: The Military, War, and Gender in Twentieth-Century Germany the author explores how women experienced transformations in their self-perception and the demands placed upon them by the state in the name of national defense. The chapter argues that women helped redefine German identity through increasing reliance on the state after 1914 for their basic welfare and food for their families. Women did not remain passive recipients, however. Embued with a new sense of power and participation, women were now more likely to take on the task of chastising any regime that failed in the role of provider. Here Davis sees the origins of direct political action in the streets, mob violence, and the virulent friend/enemy dichotomies that persisted through the Weimar and National Socialist eras.

URLhttps://www.bloomsburyculturalhistory.com/encyclopedia?docid=b-9781350048379
Original PublicationHeimat-Front: Militär und Geschlechterverhältnisse im Zeitalter der Weltkriege
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53923555

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