Die k. (u.) k. Armee als 'Schule der Volkes'? Zur Geschichte der Allgemeinen Wehrpflicht in der multinationalen Habsburgermonarchie (1866 bis 1914/18)

TitleDie k. (u.) k. Armee als 'Schule der Volkes'? Zur Geschichte der Allgemeinen Wehrpflicht in der multinationalen Habsburgermonarchie (1866 bis 1914/18)
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsHämmerle, Christa
EditorJansen, Christian
Book TitleDer Bürger als Soldat: Die Militarisierung europäischer Gesellschaften im langen 19. Jahrhundert: Ein internationaler Vergleich
Pagination175–213
PublisherKlartext
CityEssen
Abstract

This book chapter discusses the conflict-laden development of the relationship between military service in the form of universal conscription and masculine citizenship in the Habsburg Empire between 1866 and the end of the First World War 1918. From 1804 to 1867 the Habsburg Monarchy was formally unified as the Austrian Empire, and from 1867 to 1918 as the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The year 1867 thus marks the actual beginning of the constitutional state, and was followed by the introduction of universal conscription at the end of 1868. Albeit, general and equal suffrage for all men aged 24 was not implemented before 1907, for several reasons. Like nationalist representatives of parliament, also influential members of the k. (u.) k. Joint Army did oppose former attempts to broaden the male right to vote, which was based on the census. But their motifs to combat against modern political culture were different: They followed to the – at that time of European nationalism singular – concept of a multinational peoples army loyal to the ´fatherland´ and the Habsburg dynasty, and experienced the tendencies towards democratisation as highly anti-militaristic.

Translated TitleThe k. (u.) k. Army as a 'School of the People'? On the History of Compulsory Military Service in the multinational Habsburg Monarchy, 1866 to 1914/18.
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249642544

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