Gender Differences in Public Attitudes toward the Use of Force by the United States, 1990-2003

TitleGender Differences in Public Attitudes toward the Use of Force by the United States, 1990-2003
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsEichenberg, Richard C.
JournalInternational Security
Volume28
Issue1
Pagination110-141
Date Published07/2003
Abstract

In this article, the author examines the role of gender in shaping attitudes toward the U.S. use of military force. The author suggests that two factors explain why men and women have different opinions about military action: the reasons given for the use of force and the likely consequences of such action. He finds that although women are generally less likely to support overt military operations— and tend to be more sensitive to the prospect of civilian and military casualties—"[they] are not uniformly pacifist, nor are men uniformly bellicose." The author considers some of the implications of his research for two issues currently on the national political agenda: the war in Iraq and the war on terror.

URLhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/4137577
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