The Comfort Women: Japan's Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War

TitleThe Comfort Women: Japan's Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication1995
AuthorsHicks, George L.
Number of Pages303
PublisherW.W. Norton & Co.
CityNew York
Abstract

In 1938 the Japanese Imperial Forces established a "comfort station" in Shanghai. This was the first of many officially sanctioned brothels set up across Asia to service the needs of the Japanese forces. It was also the first comfort station where women, many in their early teens, were coaxed, tricked, and forcibly recruited to act as prostitutes for the Japanese military. This is an account of a shameful aspect of Japanese society and psychology, and it also explores Japanese racial and gender politics. This book allows the victims of this institutionalized rape and war crime to tell their stories, which include the aftermath of shame, alienation, and psychological damage for the victims. In addition to demanding that their stories be acknowledged in the official history of the war, former comfort women are mounting legal efforts to gain compensation from the Japanese government.

Entry by GWC Assistants / Work by GWC Assistants : 

Type of Literature:

Regions:

Countries:

Library Location: 
Call Number: 
32013785

Library: