“The barracks receives spoiled children and returns men:" Debating Military Service, Masculinity and Nation-Building in Argentina, 1901–1930

Title“The barracks receives spoiled children and returns men:" Debating Military Service, Masculinity and Nation-Building in Argentina, 1901–1930
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsAblard, Jonathan D.
JournalThe Americas
Volume74
Issue3
Start Page299
Pagination299-329
Date Published07/2017
Abstract

Argentina’s state reformers envisioned conscription as a crucial tool, not only for military defense but also for the geographic, social, and political integration of the republic. This essay explores how military conscription functioned in Argentina and how different sectors of society accepted, interpreted, and debated it during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In 1918, an anonymous conscript writing to La Protesta, an anarchist paper known for its anti-militarism, complained about life in the Argentine navy. The military was a “school of vice” where everyone was reduced to a number and was subject to the most cruel and random subordination. The conscript fumed, “You even lose control of your hair.” [Selection from text]

URLhttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/666744
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