"The Women behind the Men behind the Gun:" Gendered Identities and Militarization in the Second World War

Title"The Women behind the Men behind the Gun:" Gendered Identities and Militarization in the Second World War
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsMyers, Sarah Parry, and Kara Dixon Vuic
Book TitleRoutledge History of Gender, War, and the U.S. Military
Pagination87 - 102
Abstract

Fluctuating gendered identity construction and the militarization of the body politic mark much of the historiography of World War II. Increasing types of work available to women and minorities meant more women entered the workforce than ever before and disrupted conceptions of traditional male work. Women and African American men faced stereotypes about their abilities to perform within the US military, and both failed to receive the benefits of full citizenship at the end of the war, despite their service. Women performed a myriad of new civilian and military roles during World War II, although the now infamous image of Rosie the Riveter symbolizes American women's work in popular memory. It was through new forms of employment that Americans directly confronted shifting gender roles and the militarization of men's and women's lives. There are many directions of future study for the field of gender and World War II, particularly in the areas of masculinity, trauma, and identity. (via ebook on taylorfrancis.com)

Reprint Editionebook available 2017
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http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1044967140

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DOI:10.4324/9781315697185