From Camp Follower to Lady in Uniform: Women, Social Class and Military Institutions before 1920

TitleFrom Camp Follower to Lady in Uniform: Women, Social Class and Military Institutions before 1920
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsHacker, Barton C., and Margaret Vining
JournalContemporary European History
Volume10
Issue3
Pagination353 - 374
Date Published08/2001
Abstract

During World War I, the vast expansion of military control over civil society included women's work. Women contributed not only directly to war production but also to maintaining the entire socioeconomic structure in jobs such as trolley conductors or farm workers. Thousands of women volunteered for war work in social and relief organizations. If their work under frontline and near-frontline wartime conditions did not differ radically from the centuries-old tradition of nursing and other forms of caregiving, the considerable human force they brought to military support work raised to a new level the debate over the proper role of women in modern democratic society. Whether members of the armed forces, civilian employees, or volunteers, they all wore uniforms and contributed to overall military capability.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0960777301003022
Reprint EditionAvailable through Cambridge Journals Online.
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