Cadet and Civilian Undergraduate Attitudes toward Transgender People: A Research Note

TitleCadet and Civilian Undergraduate Attitudes toward Transgender People: A Research Note
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsEnder, Morten G., David E. Rohall, and Michael D. Matthews
JournalArmed forces and society
Volume42
Issue2
Pagination427 - 435
Date Published03/2015
Abstract

This article explores American military academy, Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and civilian undergraduate attitudes toward transgender people in general, in the workplace, and in the military. Earlier this decade, the US military experienced both the repeals of the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy and the exclusion of women from combat, yet transgender people are prohibited from serving openly in the military. This study explores tolerance toward perceived gender nonconformity by military affiliation, race/ethnicity, sex, religious affiliation, and political leaning. Most members of our sample, regardless of military affiliation, do not report that having a transgender person in the workplace would impact their job. At first glance, military academy and ROTC cadets are least tolerant of transgender people in the military and in society more generally. Further analyses shows that the impact of military affiliation is reduced substantially by controlling for background characteristics, especially political ideology and religious affiliation.

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