An Unladylike Profession: American Women War Correspondents in World War I

TitleAn Unladylike Profession: American Women War Correspondents in World War I
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsDubbs, Chris
Number of Pages326
PublisherUniversity of Nebraska Press
CityLincoln, Nebraska
Abstract

When World War I began, war reporting was a thoroughly masculine bastion of journalism. But that did not stop dozens of women reporters from stepping into the breach, defying gender norms and official restrictions to establish roles for themselves—and to write new kinds of narratives about women and war.

Chris Dubbs tells the fascinating stories of Edith Wharton, Nellie Bly, and more than thirty other American women who worked as war reporters. As Dubbs shows, stories by these journalists brought in women from the periphery of war and made them active participants—fully engaged and equally heroic, if bearing different burdens and making different sacrifices. Women journalists traveled from belligerent capitals to the front lines to report on the conflict. But their experiences also brought them into contact with social transformations, political unrest, labor conditions, campaigns for women’s rights, and the rise of revolutionary socialism. [publisher]

URLhttps://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu/potomac-books/9781640123069/
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1120142769

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