Women’s Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I–Era Los Angeles

TitleWomen’s Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I–Era Los Angeles
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsDumenil, Lynn
JournalJournal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Volume10
Issue2
Pagination213-245
Date Published04/2011
Abstract

During World War I, the Woman's Committee of the Council of National Defense served as an intermediary between the federal government and women's voluntary associations. This study of white middle- and upper-middle-class clubwomen in Los Angeles, California reveals ways in which local women pursued twin goals of aiding the war effort while pursuing their own, pre-existing agendas. Women in a wide variety of groups, including organizations associated with the General Federation of Women's Clubs, the Young Women's Christian Association, the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and the Red Cross, had different goals, but most women activists agreed on the need to promote women's suffrage and citizenship rights and to continue the maternalist reform programs begun in the Progressive Era. At the center of their war voluntarism was the conviction that women citizens must play a crucial role in protecting the family amidst the crisis of war.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1537781410000162
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54407091

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