Vienna and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire: Total War and Everyday Life in World War I

TitleVienna and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire: Total War and Everyday Life in World War I
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsHealy, Maureen
Number of Pages333
PublisherCambridge University Press
City, CountryCambridge; New York
Abstract

Maureen Healy examines the collapse of the Habsburg Empire from the perspective of everyday life in the capital city. She argues that a striking feature of "total war" on the home front was the spread of a war mentality to the mundane sites of everyday life - streets, shops, schools, entertainment venues, and apartment buildings. While Habsburg armies waged military campaigns on distant fronts, Viennese civilians (women, children, and "left at home" men) waged a protracted, socially devastating war against one another. Vienna's multi-ethnic population lived together in conditions of serve material shortage and faced near-starvation by 1917. The city fell into civilian mutiny before the state collapsed in 1918. Based on meticulous archival research, including citizens' letters to state authorities, the study offers a new and penetrating look at Habsburg citizenship by showing how ordinary women, men, and children conceived of "Austria" in the Empire's final years. –Publisher's copy

URLhttps://books.google.com/books?id=r2UXfqz0mgoC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ViewAPI
Short TitleVienna and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire
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53361545

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