Maternal Relations: Moral Manliness and Emotional Survival in Letters Home during the First World War

TitleMaternal Relations: Moral Manliness and Emotional Survival in Letters Home during the First World War
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsRoper, Michael
EditorDudink, Stefan, Karen Hagemann, and John Tosh
Book TitleMasculinities in Politics and War: Gendering Modern History
Pagination295-315
PublisherManchester University Press
CityManchester
Abstract

This chapter in the 2004 edited volume Masculinities in Politics and War: Gendering Modern History explores the changing historical construction of male subjectivity through an analysis of the compulsion to re-tell experiences of soldiering by a British officer, Lyndall Urwick (1891-1983), fighting in World War I. In Soldier Heroes (1994), Graham Dawson stresses the importance of war stories in the subjective composure of masculinity. A focus on one man’s experience of a single event in the First World War, and how his narration of that event changed in a succession of accounts written between 1914 and the 1970s, shows the significance of soldiering as a culturally vaunted means of narrating a man’s life.

URLhttps://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9780719065217/
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53375239

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